A Safari w/ 1 Carry-On?

Reply

Mar 17th, 2006, 07:43 AM
  #41
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 9,153
One thing I usually take for travel is a solid shampoo bar - I buy mine from LUSH which are definitely now trading in the US and have an online store too...

Kavey is online now  
Reply With Quote
Mar 17th, 2006, 07:44 AM
  #42
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,619
If you'd like to visit the orphanage (Rift Valley Children's Village), contact the director India Howell to see about scheduling a visit. You can check out their website at www.tanzanianchildrensfund.org. The orphanage is about 30 minutes off the main highway (turnoff is next to Ngorongoro Farmhouse's property, near Karatu.) They had one of their staff meet us and lead us in, as it's hard to find. You'll definitely need 4-wheel drive, as the road is terrible.

Our group of 14 planted trees at the site of their new orphanage in Feb. 2005 and brought 13 cases of goods from their "wish list." They shared the school supplies with Geyteghi School next door, where their kids attend. We brought so many pens and pencils that we were able to visit each class and give each student a pen or pencil, depending on their age (pencils for the younger kids.) I know you want to carry on your luggage, though, so you might not be able to take much. Cash is always appreciated! The school had a nice library building, but few books. The website explains about how to ship books overseas inexpensively, which is a good idea. I'll guarantee you that this visit will be one of the highlights of your trip!

There were several American volunteers at the orphanage, some of which taught at the school. We were at the end of our trip and gave them our leftover toiletries: shampoo, conditioner, etc. That really liked that, as they had little chance to purchase such items locally.
ShayTay is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 17th, 2006, 07:46 AM
  #43
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 20,129
Our camp-mates recently distributed many deflated soccer balls (had them shipped) to the orphanage and surrounding schools around Karatu.

Their tour company had made a prior appointments, as I was told that they don't appreciate impromtu visits.
cybor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 17th, 2006, 09:58 AM
  #44
bat
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,790
shaytay:
Thanks for that website.
bat is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 17th, 2006, 05:02 PM
  #45
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 109
Thanks for all the good ideas (and Sandi, thanks for the barrette info). Small bracelets, pens, markers, inflatable soccer balls, small notebooks~'hope I have enough room in the carry-on!

BTW, does anyone have an ideas about where to buy/not buy souveniers? Are there things that are especially "African" that we should look for? Thanks, everyone!
mairseydotes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 17th, 2006, 05:34 PM
  #46
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,619
In Arusha, safari companies often stop at the Cultural Heritage Centre. They have a large selection of items for sale. They also have Tanzanite. Oldonyo Orok, just out of town on the highway to Tarangire, is another nice shop. Hopefully, you'll get a chance to visit a Maasai village. They will have lots of beaded items for sale. Then, there's always the shops in the departures lounge in Kilimanjaro airport for those last minute items.
ShayTay is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 18th, 2006, 05:04 AM
  #47
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 109
Hi Shay Tay
Thanks~You have been so helpful! I ordered convertible pants for me and my husband and long-sleeve shirts at REI and ExOfficio. I've made notes about the orphanage, and your suggestions stops for souveniers. (We've read so much about "rip offs" and pressured situations where people feel compelled to buy things that they really don't want.) We're babes-in-the-woods and can use any/all tips, so keep 'em coming.
mairseydotes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 18th, 2006, 05:40 AM
  #48
bat
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,790
mairseydotes:
Re school supplies, you might consider checking a bag for those. I take it that your concern about carry-on is lost luggage? Although it would be irritating, a delay in receiving the school supplies would not impact the safari part of your trip. In addition to pencils, pens, paper, and blow up globe balls, we found inexpensive glow-in-the-dark animal stickers to give to school children. Lightweight, educational, and fun.
bat is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 18th, 2006, 05:53 AM
  #49
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 109
Great idea, bat!! You're right about why we insist on carry-ons for our travel. Lost/delayed luggage would be a bummer.

I love the glowy stickers idea! They would be so easy to carry. The books, notebooks, pens, markers and inflatable globes/soccer balls, nail polish could be checked. We could carry the empty bag home in our backpack.
mairseydotes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 19th, 2006, 11:49 AM
  #50
bat
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,790
That's what we did--that way we used our checked bag travel weight allowance for "free shipping" of the school supplies. Worked fine.
bat is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 19th, 2006, 04:20 PM
  #51
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 147
Just a note about what I just found out today regarding carry-on luggage limits:
We will be flying on American, British Air, and SAA on our May trip to Zambia. We are going to try to carry on everything. However, I was concerned about the 13 lb. limit on BA. When I was talking on the phone with American Airlines and expressing my concern about the BA limits, I was told that American was our "governing airline" since it was transporting us across the ocean and considered our international flight. Therefore, any other airline on our itinerary would follow the luggage limits of American. I had never heard this before and so called BA and SAA and asked them and was told the same thing.
Although American allows 40 pounds, we will not even be close to that since we will be limited by our small plane flights within Zambia. But I feel much relief not having the 13 LB limit.
I'm sure that most of you already know this, but thought I would post it for anyone else that might not know.
tigerpaw is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 21st, 2006, 09:59 AM
  #52
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 196

...On the "baggy travel zip-off pants
front" - we are travelling next February when it is supposed to be quite hot - and so I was planning to pack capri pants as a shorts+long pants compromise (the ladies' pants that reach mid-calf.) Cooler than long pants but warmer than shorts in the morning...
I guess my husband is doomed to the unflattering zip-offs!
Are sandals ok for safari? I know to bring running shoes for the occasional walking safari.
Thank you to everyone for the packing tips! Only 316 sleeps to go!!!
carolines is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 21st, 2006, 01:57 PM
  #53
sandi
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
carolines -

Yes, February can be hot, especially mid-day. I have a pair of those zip-offs, but haven't yet taken them on safari. Believe these are the originals that Banana Republic sold, when they sold mainly safari clothing. Oh my goodness, giving away my age.

Besides, the zip-offs, just look terrible. I actually take/wear jeans, though I don't recommend them to others. Guess, I just like my jeans; along with a pair of khakis, a pair of cropped pants, pair of shorts, and 1-pr of black pants... lots of t-shirts or sweaters, I'm set to go. Besides, you can have laundry done everywhere which doesn't cost much. I've been just fine with crop pants or long walking shorts.

Not even owning running shoes, I'm in mocassins, slip-in Keds or my Teva sandals. Being in a vehicle, any of these have worked for me for years.

Whatever you do, though, be sure your shoes are broken in before taking them on your trip (this or any other).
 
Reply With Quote
Mar 21st, 2006, 02:07 PM
  #54
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 20,129
Hi carolines,
I wore capris everyday on our Feb. safari for the same reasons as you. I would just roll the bottoms up if it got a bit warm. I did where a pair of thick soled leather thong type of Reef sandles on safari and in camp. Great for slipping on and off while in the jeep (I stood on the seats alot) and back and forth to the shower. Great also for our after safari beach trip.

I also brought a pair of light hikers to where while hiking. My standard daily attire was a tank top and sport bra under a loose cotton shirt with a windbreaker for the cooler am rides and down to the tank as it heated up. The cotton shirt was a nice sun cover up when nec. as is a wide brimmed vented hat with a chin tie.

DH mostly wore long knee knocking shorts most of the time and all the same except a t-shirt.
be comfortable.
Sherry
cybor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 22nd, 2006, 07:43 AM
  #55
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 196
Thank-you Sandi and Sherry for the apparel tips! Our trip is a ways away yet but great to know what to take ahead of time and take advantage of the coming summer sales! Was it very cold in February in the Crater? Do we really need to take along gloves and hats??
Just when my husband was satisfied to find I had cut down my potential packing list, we discovered and purchased the greatest duffle bags - that weigh only 2.5 pounds each! So my clothing allowance increases...!!
We've booked the "northern" part of our trip and are awaiting confirmation of Part Two. I will post our itinerary as soon as it's all done in case anyone can offer tips on special requests (thank-you Sandi for recommending tent 9 at Tortilis!) I really enjoyed both your trip reports and absolutely devour each new posting!
carolines is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 22nd, 2006, 07:49 AM
  #56
bat
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,790
We did not need hat and gloves for the crater in February. I wore a lightweight fleece jacket on the drive down (early am) which was the only time that I needed the jacket.
bat is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 22nd, 2006, 07:53 AM
  #57
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 20,129
Hi carolines,
Re: cold in Feb.
I found that I didn't need gloves and a hat in the Crater but that's just me - others have said that they have.

I brought a fleece ear band and a very thin pair of fleece gloves just in case and also to use in Amsterdam and the drive home from Boston.
Sherry
cybor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 23rd, 2006, 02:54 PM
  #58
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 11
which duffel bags are the greatest?--presently looking for duffel bags to fit on smaller planes and carry onto BA to Nairobi--thanks for response
cosmosmariner is offline  
Reply With Quote
Mar 23rd, 2006, 03:24 PM
  #59
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 138
We have just purchased two Rick Steeves convertible packpacks for our upcoming safari in Tan/Kenya/Rwanda. We got a large for me and a smaller one for my wife. We plan on carrying on for at least the trip out and not checking anything. They seem really nice and should easily hold our stuff. Of course we'll also have a daypack with camera stuff. Here's the link.

http://travelstore.ricksteves.com/ca...entId=8&id=139
martync is offline  
Reply With Quote
 


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:05 AM.