The Hill Country: Places to Explore

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Kerrville

Years ago, Kerrville had the small-town appeal that draws thousands to Fredericksburg and Boerne. With the arrival of the railroad in the late 1800s this settlement of primarily shingle-makers became a center for trade and commerce, bringing droves of urban refugees from all walks of life. Happily situated among some of the most dramatic bluffs and valleys in the Hill Country, with the Guadalupe River running through it, the town has some of the more picturesque views in Texas. Now it's one of the biggest little cities in the region. With a population of more than 20,000, Kerrville has become the source for necessities that can't be found in the smaller towns.

When Kerrville was settled in the early 1850s, it was called Brownsborough. The name was later changed to pay tribute to Texas Revolution major, James Kerr. Though Kerr was originally from Kentucky, his tenure in the war of 1812 and as a major in the legendary Texas Rangers and Republic of Texas Army brought him great notoriety. His political activism during the early years of the Republic of Texas included negotiating peace before the Fredonian Rebellion and organizing a treaty with the Karankawa Indians. For his devotion to the Texas frontier, pioneer Joshua Brown, who originally settled the area, renamed the land after Major Kerr. But despite its massive growth in the past few decades, Kerrville still has a lot to offer those looking to catch a glimpse of the region. One of Texas's most famed music festivals happens here each year. The Kerrville Folk Festival in late spring draws folk music fans from miles around to camp in fields beneath the stars and celebrate folk music for a few weeks. Kids enjoy the summer camps in the surrounding areas; families make camps of their own in the many Guadalupe River RV parks.

, and then enjoy a nice meal overlooking the Guadalupe River.

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