Recreational Areas in Pendleton

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Recreational Areas

Emigrant Springs State Heritage Area. Near the summit of the Blue Mountains, this park in an old-growth forest is the site of a popular pioneer stopover along the Oregon Trail. The park has picnic areas, hiking trails, historical information, and gathering spaces for special events. At the campground, in addition to 18 full hookups and 32 tent sites, there are seven rustic cabins, including two totem cabins. Off I–84 at Exit 234, 65068, Old Oregon Trail, , Meacham, 97859. 541/983–2277 or 800/551–6949. www.oregonstateparks.org. Day use free. Year-round.

Umatilla National Forest. Three rugged, secluded wilderness areas attract backpackers to this 1.4-million-acre forest: the Wenaha-Tucannon, the North Fork Umatilla, and the North Fork John Day. Umatilla is derived from a word in the indigenous Shahaptian language meaning "water rippling over sand," and the forest has its share of fishable rivers and streams as well. Home to the Blue Mountain Scenic Byway and 22 campgrounds, the diverse forestland is found both east and south of Pendleton, and extends south almost as far as John Day, where it borders the Malheur National Forest. To the east it is bordered by the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. Major thoroughfares through the forest include I–84, U.S. 395, and routes 204 and 244. Forest Headquarters:, 2517 SW Hailey Ave., 97801. 541/278–3716. www.fs.fed.us/r6/uma. Northwest Forest Pass required at some trailheads, $5/day or $30 annual.

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