Money

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Money

In New Mexico, Santa Fe is by far the priciest city: meals, gasoline, and motel rates are all significantly higher in the state's capital. Overall travel costs in Santa Fe, including dining and lodging, typically run 30% to 50% higher than in any other New Mexico city. Taos, too, can be a little expensive because it's such a popular tourist destination. Lodging and dining throughout much of the rest of the state are a genuine bargain. Depending on the establishment, $10 can buy you a savory dinner in Farmington, Old Mesilla, or Silver City. As the state's largest metropolitan area, Albuquerque has a full range of price choices.

Credit Cards

It's a good idea to inform your credit-card company before you travel, especially if you're going abroad and don't travel internationally very often. Otherwise, the credit-card company might put a hold on your card owing to unusual activity—not a good thing halfway through your trip. Record all your credit-card numbers—as well as the phone numbers to call if your cards are lost or stolen—in a safe place, so you're prepared should something go wrong. Both MasterCard and Visa have general numbers you can call (collect if you're abroad) if your card is lost, but you're better off calling the number of your issuing bank, since MasterCard and Visa usually just transfer you to your bank; your bank's number is usually printed on your card.

Reporting Lost Cards

American Express (800/992–3404 in U.S.; 336/393–1111 collect from abroad. www.americanexpress.com.)

Discover (800/347–2683 in U.S.; 801/902–3100 collect from abroad. www.discovercard.com.)

MasterCard (800/622–7747 in U.S.; 636/722–7111 collect from abroad. www.mastercard.com.)

Visa (800/847–2911 in U.S.; 303/581–9994 collect from abroad. www.visa.com.)

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