Boston Sights

Fenway Park

  • 4 Yawkey Way Map It
  • The Fenway
  • Sports Venue
  • Fodor's Choice

Published 07/13/2016

Fodor's Review

For 86 years, the Boston Red Sox suffered a World Series dry spell, a streak of bad luck that fans attributed to the "Curse of the Bambino," which, stories have it, struck the team in 1920 when they sold Babe Ruth (the "Bambino") to the New York Yankees. All that changed in 2004, when a maverick squad broke the curse in a thrilling seven-game series against the team's nemesis in the series semifinals. This win against the Yankees was followed by a four-game sweep of St. Louis in the finals. Boston, and its citizens' ingrained sense of pessimism, hasn't been the same since. The repeat World Series win in 2007, and again in 2013, cemented Bostonians' sense that the universe had finally begun working correctly and made Red Sox caps the residents' semiofficial uniform.

Sight Information

Address:

4 Yawkey Way, between Van Ness and Lansdowne Sts., Boston, Massachusetts, 02215, USA

Map It

Phone:

877-733–7699-box office; 617-226–6666-tours

Website: www.redsox.com

Sight Details:

  • Tours $18
  • Tours run daily 9–5, on the hr. Tickets are sold first-come, first served

Published 07/13/2016

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Aug 14, 2017

Check It Off My Bucket List!

My spouse and I attended a baseball game with two family members on a Sunday afternoon in late May 2017. Because single-game tickets were sold out on the Red Sox MLB website, we bought our tickets through third-party vendor Stubhub. Fenway Park is located in the Fenway-Kenmore neighborhood of the city. Because the field is nestled among buildings of similar architecture, construction, and height, it blends into its dense surroundings. Many bars

and restaurants line the streets surrounding the field. On game days, the city shuts down Yawkey Way (the street that lies between Van Ness and Lansdowne Streets and is named after a longtime team owner) three hours prior to game time so that fans can enjoy a sort of block/street party, with food, drinks, music, family entertainment, autographs, and merchandise for sale. The old Citgo gas station sign is an important part of the Boston skyline; in fact, the relationship between Citgo, the Red Sox, and Fenway is so recognizable that some local Little League fields display a replica of the original sign. If you cannot purchase tickets to the game, you can visit the new “Bleacher Bar”, positioned beneath the bleacher seats in center field that offers a window that looks directly through center field and into the park. In addition to attending a game, you can take one of several tours of the ballpark, ranging from an abbreviated 15-minute tour to a longer 60-minute tour, where you can see the roof deck (with its panoramic view), sit in the old 1930s seats, stand on the warning track, visit the Green monster (and meet the mascot). Fenway Park is the oldest baseball stadium in the country, where legends like Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, and Bucky Dent played. One of the most famous stories about the Red Sox is called the “Curse of the Bambino”. In 1920, the team sold Babe Ruth (nicknamed “The Bambino”) to the New York Yankees, and for the next 86 years, the Red Sox did not win a World Series, creating a streak of bad luck. But in 2004, the team broke the curse by winning against the New York Yankees in the semifinals, then winning against St. Louis in the finals. The Sox won the World Series next in 2007 and then again in 2013. In 1995, the team created the Red Sox Hall of Fame in order to recognize the outstanding careers of former players, managers, front office staff, and broadcasters. The retired Red Sox numbers of Ted Williams (9), Joe Cronin (4), Bobby Doerr (1), Carl Yastrzemski (8), Carlton Fisk (27), Johnny Pesky (6), and Jim Rice (14), along with Jackie Robinson's number 42 (retired by Major League Baseball in 1997), are displayed on the right field facade. Other notable features of the ballpark are the “Green Monster” (a nickname for the high left-field wall), and the scoreboard below the wall (which is still updated by hand throughout the game from behind). A newer feature is the Fenway Farms rooftop garden tended by Green City Growers that supplies fresh produce for the stadium. We enjoyed watching a Red Sox game at renowned Fenway Park, even though the Sox lost that day to the Seattle Mariners.

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