Baltimore Sights

Visiting Baltimore without seeing the Inner Harbor is like touring New York City and skipping Manhattan. The harbor and surrounding area are home to a good number of the city's most popular sites: the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Camden Yards, M&T Bank Stadium, the American Visionary Arts Museum, and The Maryland Science Center.

The neighborhoods themselves are fun to explore. Historic

Federal Hill, just south of the Inner Harbor, is home to some of the oldest houses in the city. Fells Point and Canton, farther east, are lively waterfront communities. Mount Vernon and Charles Village have wide avenues lined with grand old row houses that were once home to Baltimore's wealthiest residents. Farther north are Roland Park (Frederick Law Olmsted Jr. contributed to its planning), Guilford, Homeland, and Mt. Washington, all leafy, residential neighborhoods with cottages, large Victorian houses, and redbrick Colonials. It's easy to tour the Inner Harbor and neighborhoods such as Mount Vernon, Federal Hill, Charles Village, and Fells Point on foot. To travel between areas or farther out, however, the light rail or a car is more efficient. Most of the Inner Harbor's parking is in nearby garages, though meters can be found along Key Highway. In other neighborhoods, you can generally find meters and two-hour free parking on the street.

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Inner Harbor-Downtown 22

Mount Vernon 11

West Baltimore 10

Charles Village 7

Havre de Grace 6

Fells Point 4

Druid Hill Park 2

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Local Interest–Sight 1

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Restaurant–Sight 1

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Baltimore Sights

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Steppingstone Museum

  • Museum/Gallery

The Steppingstone Museum is a 10-acre complex of seven restored turn-of-the-20th-century farm buildings plus a replica of a canning house.

Susquehanna Museum

  • Museum/Gallery

The Susquehanna Museum, at the southern terminal of the defunct Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal, tells the history of the canal and the...

The Power Plant

  • Store/Shop/Mall

What actually was the city's former power plant is now a retail and dining complex that includes the flagship Phillips Seafood Restaurant,...

Top of the World Observation Deck

  • Building/Architectural Site

With 32 stories, Baltimore's World Trade Center, designed by I.M. Pei's firm, is the world's tallest pentagonal structure. The 27th-floor...

U.S. Army Ordnance Museum

  • Museum/Gallery

The Aberdeen Proving Ground is a 75,000-acre U.S. Army installation on the Chesapeake Bay, about 30 mi northeast of Baltimore's Inner...

USS Constellation

  • Nautical Site/Lighthouse

Launched in 1854, the USS Constellation was the last—and largest—all-sail ship built by the U.S. Navy. Before the Civil War, as...

Walters Art Museum

  • Museum/Gallery

The Walters' prodigious collection of more than 30,000 artworks provides an organized overview of human history over 5,500 years, from...

Washington Monument

  • Memorial/Monument/Tomb

Completed on July 4, 1829, the impressive monument was the first one dedicated to the nation's first president. An 18-foot statue depicting...

Westminster Cemetery and Catacombs

  • Cemetery

The city's oldest cemetery is the final resting place of Edgar Allan Poe and other famous Marylanders, including 15 generals from the...

Woman's Industrial Exchange

  • Store/Shop/Mall

This Baltimore institution was organized in the 1880s as a way for destitute women, many of them Civil War widows, to support themselves...

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