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The Getty Center

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The Getty Center Review

With its curving walls and isolated hilltop perch, the Getty Center resembles a pristine fortified city of its own. You may have been lured up by the beautiful views of L.A. (on a clear day stretching all the way to the Pacific Ocean), but the architecture, uncommon gardens, and fascinating art collections will be more than enough to capture and hold your attention. When the sun is out, the complex's rough-cut travertine marble skin seems to soak up the light.

J. Paul Getty, the billionaire oil magnate and art collector, began collecting Greek and Roman antiquities and French decorative arts in the 1930s. He opened the J. Paul Getty Museum at his Malibu estate in 1954, and in the 1970s, he built a re-creation of an ancient Roman village to house his initial collection. When Getty died in 1976, the museum received an endowment of $700 million that grew to a reported $4.5 billion. The Malibu villa, reopened in 2006, is devoted to the antiquities. The Getty Center, designed by Richard Meier, opened in 1998 and pulled together the rest of the collections, along with the museum's affiliated research, conservation, and philanthropic institutes.

Getting to the center involves a bit of anticipatory lead-up. At the base of the hill, a pavilion disguises the underground parking structure. From there you either walk or take a smooth, computer-driven tram up the steep slope, checking out the Bel Air estates across the humming 405 freeway. The five pavilions that house the museum surround a central courtyard and are bridged by walkways. From the courtyard, plazas, and walkways, you can survey the city from the San Gabriel Mountains to the ocean.

In a ravine separating the museum and the Getty Research Institute, conceptual artist Robert Irwin created the playful Central Garden in stark contrast to Meier's mathematical architectural geometry. The garden's design is what Hollywood feuds are made of: Meier couldn't control Irwin's vision, and the two men sniped at each other during construction, with Irwin stirring the pot with every loose twist his garden path took. The result is a refreshing garden walk whose focal point is an azalea maze (some insist the Mickey Mouse shape is on purpose) in a reflecting pool.

Inside the pavilions are the galleries for the permanent collections of European paintings, drawings, sculpture, illuminated manuscripts, and decorative arts, as well as American and European photographs. The Getty's collection of French furniture and decorative arts, especially from the early years of Louis XIV (1643–1715) to the end of the reign of Louis XVI (1774–92), is renowned for its quality and condition; you can see a pair of completely reconstructed salons. In the paintings galleries, a computerized system of louvered skylights allows natural light to filter in, creating a closer approximation of the conditions in which the artists painted. Notable among the paintings are Rembrandt's The Abduction of Europa, Van Gogh's Irises, Monet's Wheatstack, Snow Effects, and Morning, and James Ensor's Christ's Entry into Brussels.

If you want to start with a quick overview, pick up the brochure in the entrance hall that guides you to 15 highlights of the collection. There's also an instructive audio tour ($5) with commentaries by art historians. Art information rooms with multimedia computer stations contain more details about the collections. The Getty also presents lectures, films, concerts, and special programs for kids and families. The complex includes an upscale restaurant and downstairs cafeteria with panoramic window views, and two outdoor coffee bar cafés. On-site parking is subject to availability and can fill up by late afternoon on holidays and summer weekends, so try to come early in the day. You may also take public transportation (MTA Bus 761).

    Contact Information

  • Address: 1200 Getty Center Dr., Brentwood, Los Angeles, CA 90049 | Map It
  • Phone: 310/440–7300
  • Cost: Free, parking $15
  • Hours: Tues.–Fri. 10–5:30, Sat. 10–9, Sun. 10–5:30
  • Website:
  • Location: Beverly Hills and the Westside
Updated: 05-20-2013

Fodorite Reviews

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    The Getty Center Review

    The Getty Center is a regular stop for my out of town guests - everyone loves it. Although the collection isn't on par with museums in NYC, London or Paris, it's still worthwhile, with some beautiful pieces. What is most charming is the space - the architecture is astounding. The gardens are remarkable. The restaurant better than average. And, on a clear day, you can see forever!

    by jahlie, 3/16/11
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    Perfect Last View of California

    I took friends from Britain to the Getty last Friday. We spent the afternoon browsing the exhibits, sitting outside appreciating the architecture and gazing at the amazing views, walking in the fabulous gardens and topped it off with a delicious dinner in the restaurant. The food is excellent and the service is superb. The prices are quite reasonable and the wine list has some excellent, and also reasonably priced, selections. My friends were leaving the next day to go home to Britain and this was the perfect way to end their visit to California.

    by Barbara, 8/17/08

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