Car Travel

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Car Travel

Most visitors drive to this corner of the state—after all, Kingman is on the longest remaining stretch of Route 66. At first glance, the countryside can seem a bit stark and remote, but there are many surprises in this part of the world, including the strange-looking Joshua tree, the defining plant of the Mojave Desert. There are no traffic jams and navigation is easy in these fairly small towns.

Historic Route 66 crosses east–west and curves north of Interstate 40, which provides the fastest path across the region. U.S. 93 is the main route for north–south travel. All of these roads are in excellent condition. On Interstate 40 high winds occasionally raise enough blowing dust to restrict visibility. In winter, ice may be present on Interstate 40 east of Kingman, as well as on sections of Route 66. When signage warns of ice ahead, slow down. Most of the county roads are improved dirt roads, but washboard sections bounce you around a bit, so take your time and drive no faster than prudence dictates. Beware that many maps and GPS devices show what appear to be viable dirt roads that may actually be unmaintained or even abandoned—stick with established routes if you're ever unsure. Fuel up while you're in this part of Arizona—all grades of gasoline can be as much as 30¢ to 50¢ per gallon less in Kingman and Bullhead City than across the border in Nevada and California.

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