Car Travel

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Car Travel

It's virtually impossible to see much of northeastern Arizona without a car—this is your best bet not only for getting here, but also for visiting attractions and communities throughout the region.

Many visitors see northeastern Arizona as part of a road-tripping adventure through the Four Corners Region, perhaps combining their visit with trips to the national parks of southern Utah and southwestern Colorado. This "en route" road-tripping strategy makes the most sense, especially given the region's stunningly scenic drives—the Navajo Nation has a terrific website (navajoscenicroads.com) geared toward road-tripping.

Road Conditions and Services

Most of the 27,000 square miles of the Navajo Reservation and other areas of northeastern Arizona are off the beaten track. It's prudent to stay on the well-maintained paved thoroughfares. If you don't have the equipment for wilderness travel—including a four-wheel-drive vehicle and provisions—and lack backcountry experience, stay off dirt roads unless they're signed and graded and the skies are clear. Be on the lookout for ominous rain clouds in summer or signs of snow in winter. Never drive into dips or low-lying areas during a heavy rainstorm, and be vigilant for both wildlife and livestock (the Navajo Nation is open range, meaning cattle roam freely). If you heed these simple precautions, car travel through the region is as safe as anywhere else in the Southwest. While driving around the Navajo Nation, tune in to 660 AM (KTNN) for local news and weather.

A tour of Navajo-Hopi country can involve driving significant distances between widely scattered communities, so a detailed, up-to-date road map is essential. Road service, auto repairs, and other automotive services are few and far between, so service your vehicle before venturing into the Navajo and Hopi reservations (or do so in the larger communities, such as Tuba City, Kayenta, and Window Rock), and carry emergency equipment and supplies.

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