Health Concerns

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Health Concerns

Although Mexico (in particular, Mexico City) was the epicenter of the early 2009 H1N1 outbreak, the health alerts were lowered and things returned to normal by May. Ultimately there were more cases of and deaths from swine flu in the United States than in Mexico—or anywhere else. By June the only signs of Mexico City's flu scare were the occasional citizen wearing a mask and the antibacterial dispensers at some attractions and restaurants all over town.

To help people feel more comfortable, however, in July 2009 tourism officials implemented a plan whereby visitors to the capital receive health-insurance coverage on check-in at any Mexico City hotel.

Truth be told, the city's elevation and its air quality should be more of a concern to you. Initially the change in elevation may affect your breathing, sleep patterns, digestion, and alcohol tolerance. Take it easy, drink lots of water, and lay off the cocktails.

Several government initiatives have improved Mexico City's air quality. Still, if you have respiratory problems, avoid walking along busy streets during rush hour. The smog is heaviest from mid-November through January, and lightest in September and October.

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