Cancún Sights

Taxis from the Zona to El Centro cost around MX$270 each way. A more affordable alternative is to catch a north-bound public bus to the Kukulcán–Bonampak intersection, which marks the beginning of El Centro (MX$10). From here, you can explore by foot or flag down a taxi to your area of choice. If you want to get a taste of downtown culture, start at the colorful Mercado Veintiocho or Parque de

las Palapas. To return to the Zona Hotelera, take a taxi to the Chedraui on Avenida Tulum and then catch a bus that passes every few minutes toward the Zona. (Don't be alarmed if a man in a clown suit roams the aisle in search of tips: at night the buses come alive with all sorts of amateur performers, from accordionists to jugglers, hoping to earn a few pesos.)

South of Punta Cancún, Boulevard Kukulcán becomes a busy road and is difficult for pedestrians to cross. It's also punctuated by steeply inclined driveways that turn into the hotels, most of which are set back at least 100 yards from the road. The lagoon side of the boulevard consists of scrubby stretches of land alternating with marinas, shopping centers, and restaurants. Because there are so few sights, there are no orientation tours of Cancún: just do the local bus circuit to get a feel for your surroundings. Buses run until midnight, and you'll rarely have to wait more than five minutes.

When you first visit El Centro, the downtown layout might not be self-evident. It's not based on a grid but rather on a circular pattern. The whole city is divided into districts called Super Manzanas (abbreviated “Sm” in this book), each with its own central square or park. In general, walks through downtown are somewhat unpleasant, with whizzing cars, corroded pathways, and overgrown weeds. Sidewalks disappear for brief moments, forcing pedestrians to cross grassy inlets and thin strips of land separating four lanes of traffic. Few people seem to know exactly where anything is, even the locals who live in El Centro. When exploring on foot, expect to get lost at least once and enjoy it—you may just stumble on a courtyard café or a lively cantina.

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Cancún Sights

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Playa Gaviota Azul

  • Beach–Sight

Heading down from Punta Cancún onto the long, southerly stretch of the island, Playa Gaviota Azul (literally "Blue Seagull Beach," but...

Playa Langosta

  • Beach–Sight

Small, placid "Lobster Beach" has safe waters and gentle waves that make it a popular swimming spot for families and Spring Breakers...

Playa Linda

  • Beach–Sight

At Km 4 on Boulevard Kukulcán, "Pretty Beach" is where the ocean meets the freshwater of Laguna Nichupté to create the Nichupté Channel.

Playa Marlin

  • Beach–Sight

Accessible via a road next to Kukulcán Plaza, "Marlin Beach" is a seductive stretch of sand in the heart of the Zona Hotelera at Km.

Playa Pez Volador

  • Beach–Sight

The calm surf and relaxing shallows of Playa Pez Volador make it an aquatic playground for families with young children. Marked by a...

Playa Punta Nizuc

  • Beach–Sight

You’ll find Cancún’s most isolated and deserted beach on the southern tip of the peninsula. Far from the crowds and party scene,...

Playa Tortugas

  • Beach–Sight

Don't be fooled by the name—this spot is seldom frequented by tortugas . It’s the opportunity to swim, snorkel, kayak, paraglide,...

Playa las Perlas

  • Beach–Sight

Pearl Beach" is the first heading east from El Centro along Boulevard Kukulcán. Located at Km 2.5, between the Cancún mainland and...

Ruinas el Rey

  • Archaeological Site/Ruins

Large signs on the Zona Hotelera's lagoon side, roughly opposite Playa Delfines, point out the Ruins of the King. Although much smaller...

Yamil Lu'um

  • Archaeological Site/Ruins

Located on Cancún's highest point (the name means "hilly land"), this archaeological site is on the grounds of the Park Royal Cancún...

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