Venice: Neighborhoods

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  • Burano

    Cheerfully painted houses in a riot of colors—blue, yellow, pink, ocher, and dark red—line the canals of this quiet village where lace making rescued a faltering fishing-based economy...

  • Cannaregio

    Settled primarily in the 15th century, at a time when Renaissance ideas of town planning had some effect, Cannaregio differs from medieval Venice, where the shape of the islands usually defines...

  • Castello

    Castello, Venice's largest sestiere, includes all of the land from east of Piazza San Marco to the city's easternmost tip. Its name probably comes from a fortress that once stood on one of the...

  • Dorsoduro

    The sestiere Dorsoduro (named for its "hard back" solid clay foundation) is across the Grand Canal to the south of San Marco. It is a place of meandering canals, the city's finest art museums,...

  • Giudecca

    The island of Giudecca's name is something of a mystery. It may come from a possible 14th-century Jewish settlement, or because 9th-century nobles condemned to giudicato (exile) were sent here. It...

  • The Lido

    The Lido is Venice’s barrier island, forming the southern border of the Venetian Lagoon and protecting Venice from the waters of the Adriatic. It forms the beach of Venice, and is home to a...

  • Murano

    In the 13th century the Republic, concerned about fire hazard and anxious to maintain control of its artisans' expertise, moved its glassworks to Murano, still renowned for its glass. As in...

  • San Giorgio Maggiore

    Beckoning travelers across Saint Mark's Basin, sparkling white through the mist, is the island of San Giorgio Maggiore, separated by a small channel from the Giudecca. A tall brick bell toweron...

  • San Marco

    Extending from the Piazza San Marco to the Rialto bridge, the Sestiere San Marco comprises the historical and commercial heart of Venice. Aside from the Piazza—San Marco is the only square in...

  • San Michele

    San Michele is the cemetery island of Venice, but unless you’re interested in paying your respects to notables such as Ezra Pound and Igor Stravinsky, the main reason to make the crossing is to...

  • San Polo

    San Polo has two major sites, Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari and the Scuola Grande di San Rocco, as well as some worthwhile but lesser-known churches. Food shops abound in the area surrounding the...

  • Santa Croce

    Santa Croce’s two important churches are San Stae on the Grand Canal and San Giovanni Elemosinario, adjacent to the Rialto Market. The quarter’s most pleasing architectural assemblage is the...

  • Torcello

    Torcello offers ancient mosaics, greenery, breathing space, and picnic opportunities. Some people call this tiny island the most magical place in Venice. Nearly deserted today (except for the posh...

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