The Dolomites: Places to Explore

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  • Bolzano (Bozen)

    Bolzano (Bozen), capital of the autonomous province of Alto Adige, is tucked among craggy peaks in a Dolomite valley 77 km (48 miles) from the Brenner Pass and Austria. Tirolean culture dominates Bolzano's... Read more

  • Bormio

    At the foot of Stelvio Pass, Bormio is the most famous ski resort on the western side of the Dolomites, with 38 km (24 miles) of long pistes and a 5,000-plus-foot vertical drop. In summer its cool temperatures... Read more

  • Bressanone (Brixen)

    Bressanone (Brixen) is an important artistic center and was the seat of prince-bishops for centuries. Like their counterparts in Trento, these medieval administrators had the delicate task of serving two... Read more

  • Brunico (Bruneck)

    Brunico's medieval quarter nestles below a 13th-century bishop's castle. In the heart of the Val Pusteria, this quiet and quaint town is divided by the Rienza River, with the old quarter on one side and... Read more

  • Caldaro (Kaltern)

    A vineyard village with clear views of castles high up on the surrounding mountains represents the centuries of division that forged the unique character of the area. Caldaro architecture is famous for... Read more

  • Canazei

    Of the year-round resort towns in the Val di Fassa, Canazei is the most popular. The mountains around this small town are threaded with hiking trails and ski slopes, surrounded by large clutches of conifers... Read more

  • Cortina d'Ampezzo

    The archetypal Dolomite resort, Cortina d'Ampezzo entices those seeking both relaxation and adventure. The town is the western gateway to the Strade Grande delle Dolomiti, and actually crowns the northern... Read more

  • Lago di Carezza

  • Madonna di Campiglio

    The winter resort of Madonna di Campiglio vies with Cortina d'Ampezzo as the most fashionable place for Italians to ski and be seen in the Dolomites. Madonna's popularity is well deserved, with 39 lifts... Read more

  • Merano (Meran)

    The second-largest town in Alto Adige, Merano (Meran) was once the capital of the Austrian region of Tirol. When the town and surrounding area were ceded to Italy as part of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles... Read more

  • Naturno (Naturns)

    Colorful houses covered with murals line the streets of Naturno (Naturns).... Read more

  • Ortisei (St. Ulrich)

    Ortisei (St. Ulrich), the jewel in the crown of Val Gardena's resorts, is a hub of activity in both summer and winter; there are hundreds of miles of hiking trails and accessible ski slopes.... For centuries... Read more

  • Passo dello Stelvio

  • Trento

    Trento is a prosperous, cosmopolitan university town that retains an architectural charm befitting its historical importance. It was here, from 1545 to 1563, that the structure of the Catholic Church was... Read more

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