Emergencies

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Emergencies

In Santo Domingo and major destinations, 911 is the general emergency number; you'll normally find an operator who can speak some English.

If you need to speak to the police, contact Politur, a police force that has been created and specially trained to aid tourists. Most officers speak some English, are polite, and are not as accustomed to thinking about getting money on the side—although it happens.

A private ambulance service now exists in Santo Domingo, Puerto Plata, La Romana, and Santiago, and they will sometimes go to outlying areas. Movi Med will inform you when you call that they will want to be paid in cash—cash on delivery, so to speak. Just say okay. When the victim is delivered to a hospital, there is usually an ATM inside. If not, tell the driver to take you to one.

Aero Ambulancia, a division of Helidosa Helicopters, a well-established company for tours and transfers, now has a medivac service as well as insurance you can buy to safeguard yourself in case you should need their services during an emergency.

Santo Domingo and Santiago have the best medical facilities in the country. These cities have 24-hour pharmacies. It's rare to find them outside these cities. You'll be able to recognize farmacias by their large red or green crosses. In most places, 9 pm is closing time for pharmacies.

Emergencies

Movi Med (809/532–000 in Santo Domingo; 1–200–0911 elsewhere in D.R.)

Aero Ambulancia (809/826–4100 Ext. 2222; 809/826–4100 Ext. 3333; 829/722–4666 cell for emergencies; 829/933–4666 cell for emergencies. .)

U.S. Embassies & Consulates

U.S. Consulate (Calle Cesar Nicolas Penson, corner of Maximo Gomez, La Esperilla, Santo Domingo. 809/221–2171.)

United States Embassy (Leopoldo Navarro, at Calle Cesar Nicolas Penson, Gascue, Santo Domingo. 809/221–2171.)

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