Eating Out

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Eating Out

These days fusion food is what's putting Australia on the foodie map—indeed, many claim that the very term was invented Down Under. The huge Asian communities in cities like Sydney and Melbourne have brought their traditional condiments and cooking styles to bear on local staples: the resulting combinations are what many of the country's most famous eateries specialize in.

Bush tucker, or indigenous Australian food, was once something you came across only on bushwalking expeditions in the Outback. Suddenly it's become fashionable, and uniquely Australian ingredients like lemon myrtle, wattle seed, and rosella (not to mention kangaroo meat) are appearing on fancy restaurant menus all over the country. Food is an international language, but your English may fail you in Australian restaurants. "Entrée" means appetizer, and "main courses" are what American entrées go by. The term "silver service" indicates upscale dining. French fries are called "hot chips," chickens are "chooks," sausages are known as "snags," and if you want ketchup, ask for "tomato sauce."

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