The Kansai Region Travel Guide

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Guidebooks

Plan Your The Kansai Region Vacation

Stretching from Mie Prefecture in the east to Hyogo Prefecture in the west, the Kansai region is both a snapshot of archetypal Japan and a showcase for the country’s diversity. As home to Japan’s capitals for nearly a millennium, Kansai is the undisputed seat of Japanese culture and tradition. It is the birthplace of Japan’s traditional theater styles—Noh, Kabuki, and Bunraku—as well as the tea ceremony, Japanese Buddhism, and ikebana (flower arrangement). Thanks to Kobe and Osaka, it was also the heart of Japanese trade and industry until Tokyo surpassed it in the 1970s.

Hotels

The Kansai Region Hotels

Hotels in Kansai are slightly cheaper than those in Tokyo. Business hotels and international hotels comprise most of the lodging offerings in the larger...read more

Restaurants

The Kansai Region Restaurants

Thanks to its history and unique culture, the Kansai region offers an unparalleled variety of Japanese cuisine. In addition to the local specialties of...read more

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Things To Do

Things To Do in The Kansai Region

Explore the best sights, entertainment, and shopping with our top choices and insider tips.

Hotels

The Kansai Region Experiences

  • Top Reasons to Go

    Architecture: Skyscrapers share Osaka's 1,500-year-old skyline with 4th-century burial mounds, while Nara's wealth of classical temples, pagodas... Read more

  • Nara's Sacred Deer

    Of all the attractions in Nara, there is one that no visitor can miss. At some point, as you wander between temples, the city’s sacred deer will... Read more

  • Sake, the Japanese Drink

    Sake, or nihonshu, is the essential Japanese drink. Ranging in taste from fruity and bright to rich and mellow, there is a nihonshu for virtually... Read more

  • Venice of the East

    When Tokyo was but a fishing village and Kyoto a mountain hamlet, big things were happening in Osaka. The Osaka-Nara region was the center of... Read more

  • On the Menu

    Osakans are passionate about food. In fact, they coined the word kuidaore—to eat until you drop. They expect restaurants to use the freshest... Read more

  • Try, Try, Try Again

    Toshodai-ji Temple was built in 751 for Ganjin, a Chinese priest who traveled to Japan at the invitation of Emperor Shomu. At that time, Japanese... Read more

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