Rome Dining

dining_food.jpgIl Convivio Troiani. Quietly redefining the experience of Italian alta cucina for many years, this spot is run by the three Troiani brothers with spectacular results in the kitchen: “roast beef” of tuna fillet lacquered with chestnut honey, or the squid-ink risotto with baby cuttlefish, will sate the appetites of those with dreams of fantasia. $$$$

La Pergola. The most celebrated restaurant in Rome is one of the best places in the ancient city (well, it’s in the Hilton on the modern outskirts) in which to indulge in haute and nouvelle cuisine. $$$$

Agata e Romeo. For the perfect marriage of fine dining, creative cuisine, and rustic Roman tradition, you can do no better than the husband-and-wife team of Agata Parisella and Romeo Caraccio. The signature style is both simple and elegant, perhaps best seen in the sformato di formaggio di fossa (a souffle-tart of sheep’s cheese aged in special caves) with a pear sauce and Acacia honey—a perfect balance between sweet and sharp. $$$–$$$$

Dal Bolognese. The darling of the media, film, and fashion communities, this classic restaurant on Piazza del Popolo is not only an “in-crowd” dinner destination but also happens to be the place for rich, wonderful Bolognese-style cuisine. $$–$$$$

dining_plate.jpgIl Simposio di Costantini. At perhaps the most upscale wine bar in town, you can sit at the bar and sip and chat with the owners about why you prefer pinot nero to merlot, or order a full meal at this enoteca-turned-restaurant. $$–$$$$

Antico Arco. Attracting foodies with its culinary inventiveness and high style, this spot high up on the Janiculum Hill is set in a precious little villa, making for a homey ambience. The molten chocolate souffle is justly famous among chocoholics all over the city. $$—$$$

Romolo. Raphael used to court his love, La Fornarina, here while he painted up a storm at the Villa Farnesina across the way. A summer evening at one of the garden candlelit tables is magic. $$–$$$

Nino. Just down the block from the Spanish Steps, this has been a favorite among international journalists and fashionistas for decades. With its yellow walls, dark-wood paneling and framed prints, the ambience is both cultured and cozy. $$–$$$

dining_pizza.jpgDitirambo. Feel the pulse of Campo de’ Fiori street life as you sample surprising variations on traditional Mediterranean cuisine. $$

Obika. If you’ve ever wanted to take in a “mozzarella bar,” here’s your chance. Mozzarella is featured here much like sushi bars showcase fresh fish—even the decor is modern Japanese minimalism-meets-ancient Roman grandeur. $–$$

Dar Poeta. Who makes the best pizza in Rome is a dispute never to be settled, but Dar Poeta is a perennial contender. ¢–$

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