Where To Eat In Hong Kong Now

Courtesy of The Drunken Pot

Hong Kong is a haven for gourmands and there’s rarely a shortage of hot new restaurants to try. Month after month, the city ushers in more international cuisine, design-forward interiors, and quirky new concepts. The Soho area is still a hub of foodie finds, but the western districts of Sheung Wan, Sai Ying Pun, and Kennedy Town have turned into hot spots as well. But it’s not all happening on Hong Kong Island: Kowloon is upping its gourmet game with a few impressive addresses with sky-high views. Get ready to feast your eyes on this delicious new lineup of restaurants in Hong Kong.—Kate Springer

Black Sheep Restaurants

Maison Libanaise

Conveniently located along the Mid-Levels Escalator in Soho, Maison Libanaise celebrates the authentic culture and cuisine of Lebanon. Helmed by all-star chef James Harrison, who trained with Michelin-starred chef Greg Malouf, the kitchen crew makes almost everything in-house, from the spiced yogurt to the pita bread, baba ganoush, mint tea, and almond falafel. The spacious three-story restaurant is unique in Central, showcasing eclectic geometric patterns and splashes of color at every turn, not to mention ample room to stretch out. The ground floor acts as a casual takeout spot, the first floor is home to an open kitchen and casual dining room, and the rooftop offers an open-air space for evening rendezvous. No matter where you sit, the generous sharing portions pair perfectly with Lebanese wine, Middle Eastern–inspired cocktails, and perhaps a dessert—try the the olive oil rose cake if you’re looking for something that’s as photogenic as it is delicious.

Insider Tip: The restaurant is one of the only places in Hong Kong where you can sample Lebanese wines.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

The Drunken Pot

The Drunken Pot

Now open in 8 Observatory Road tower, The Drunken Pot is changing hot pot as we know it. You no longer have to go to a grungy all-you-can-eat restaurant to enjoy the regional specialty—instead, you can enjoy the contemporary interiors and awesome views at this hot spot. Hot pot here takes it to the next level with innovative ingredients, such as sake-infused broths, homemade deep-fried bean curd rolls, rainbow-colored xiaolongbao soup dumplings, and even penguin-shaped fish balls. If the sun peeks out during your visit, snag a seat on the outdoor terrace and enjoy one of the bar’s hand-crafted cocktails while you dig in.

Insider Tip: To try a bit of everything with the signature five-in-one “Drunken Pot,” which comes with fiery Sichuan, seafood, satay, squid ink, and sake-papaya broths.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Foxglove

Foxglove

When Mrs. Pound opened up its stamp shop façade in Sheung Wan, everyone went wild over the secret entrance, colorful interiors, and southeast Asian fare. Now sister restaurant Foxglove, under the guise of a fancy umbrella shop, brings the same excitement to Central’s quiet Duddell Street. Unlike Mrs. Pound, Foxglove creates an elegant English atmosphere in what feels like an airplane hangar, featuring a retro bar and several secret dining areas. During the day, expect fresh modern European-Japanese fare, but come nightfall, Foxglove turns into a sexy jazz bar pumping out live music and immaculate cocktails alongside for its fashionable clientele.

Insider Tip: On Mondays and Fridays, Foxglove offers an executive lunch set with a glass of complimentary Moët Impérial Champagne.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Okra

OKRA

A narrow little izakaya on the edge of Sheung Wan and Sai Ying Pun,OKRA serves out-of-the-box Japanese food in a convivial setting. Helmed by New Orleans–born chef Max Levy, OKRA comes complete with custom-made ceramics, an open kitchen, 12 bar seats, a few standing spots, and a healthy selection of sake. As you can tell by a quick look at the one-page menu, the dishes don’t cater to expectations, combining ingredients such as beef pastrami with cabbage, BBQ unagi and miso duck liver, sunny side-up eggs with XO sauce, or smoked anchovies with tofu and uni.

Insider Tip: The original OKRA opened in Beijing, in a charming courtyard-style complex called 1949—The Hidden City.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Potato Head

Potato Head

Touching down on Third Street, up a steep hill in Sai Ying Pun, Potato Head has amped up the neighborhoodwith an experiential space. The spacious restaurant is outfitted with a dedicated music room, an all-day I Love You So Coffee café, and an expansive retail space selling artisan Indonesian textiles. But the main event is Kaum restaurant, which translates to “tribe” in Bahasa, which champions the country’s often-overlooked culinary traditions alongside Bali-inspired cocktails.

Insider Tip: Although the original location of Potato Head Beach Club is in Bali, there’s also a one in Singapore.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Seafood Room

Seafood Room

Hong Kong is famous for its cramped spaces, so it’s sincerely refreshing to enterSeafood Room. Sprawling across 8,000 square feet, this lofty new addition to Causeway Bay delivers on its promise: fresh seafood and tons of room. Light streams in from floor-to-ceiling windows, a semi-open kitchen showcases fresh catches, and works from Japanese artist Takashi Murakami, George Condo, and Adrien Brody (yes, the actor) adorn the walls. It’s a design-centric address that’s packing lots of personality, from the curio jars by the entrance to the dramatic chandeliers and pops of color in the dining rooms. Curious about the menu? It covers everything under the sea—or at least 50 seafood dishes taking flavor inspirations from around the world.

Insider Tip: A small terrace attached to the bar offers a few calm lounge areas, but head up one flight of stairs for an expansive 2,000-square-foot deck overlooking Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Sarie Moolenburgh.

Knead

All-day café Knead is in the heart of Sheung Wan, just a couple of blocks from the MTR. It’s a cute and cozy spot, complete with white stools, pressboard tabletops, and a cool mural. The menu has an array of salads and sandwiches that you can build yourself by choosing a base, protein, toppings, cheese . . . the list goes on. A simple sandwich shop wouldn’t normally get everyone so excited, but good bread is hard to come by in humid Hong Kong. Luckily, Knead nails it in the baked goods department, with everything from Turkish bread to quinoa loaves. As for sides, crispy French fries and warm cookies are highly recommended.

Insider Tip: If you’re paralyzed by choice, check out the board in the back with sandwich and salad recommendations that have been predesigned for indecisive diners. While you’re there, try one of the Gweilo beers in the fridge—it’s an aromatic, locally brewed ale.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Black Sheep Restaurants

BELON

BELON certainly has its priorities in order, with warm woodwork and leisurely vibes channelling the inviting bistros and restaurants in the 11th arrondissement of Paris—think high-quality food and a natural approach. A new concept from the Hong Kong–based Black Sheep Restaurants, the bistro focuses on French techniques with an Asian touch, such as grilled Hokkaido scallops with seaweed butter, beetroots baked in salt with walnuts, and the signature roast chicken with pommes Anna.

Insider Tip: À la françaises, BELON boasts an impressive selection of natural and biodynamic wines that will pair perfectly with your Parisian meal.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Rhoda

Rhoda

A new location from the trendsetting JIA Group, which also just helped to bring Potato Head to Hong Kong, Rhoda joined the stable of great eateries in the hilly streets of Sai Ying Pun in May 2016. No two meals at this casual restaurant will be the same: the menu changes daily, based on whatever’s freshest at the markets. Whether grilled, roasted, or sautéed, it’s safe to expect a delicious dinner, given chef Nate Green’s tenure at beloved 22 Ships and Ham and Sherry in Wan Chai. This time, chef Green turns the spotlight on the concept of conversational, family-style dining, even naming the place after his grandmother.

Insider Tip: Finish dinner with with an oft-forgotten glass of port or Calvados (apple brandy) to celebrate an excellent holiday in Hong Kong.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Courtesy of Vanimal

Vanimal

It’s hard to imagine a vegetarian restaurant generating this much buzz, but vegans and carnivores alike have been heading west to try this new warehouse-chic restaurant in Kennedy Town. With a '90s music soundtrack, Vanimal impresses with incredibly fresh produce, creative main courses, and innovative cocktails sporting quirky names like “Leeches Blood” and “After A Fight.” Most of the ingredients have been either locally sourced, if not homemade—try the tongue-tickling pickles as an appetizer to start your meal on a high note.

Insider Tip: Spring for the catch of the day: there’s no seafood, but rather an abundantly colorful “ozonized” salad with whatever’s fresh, served with a side of homemade chamomile oil.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Deligator

Deligator

Once considered Hong Kong’s red light district, Wan Chai has evolved into a much more cultured scene thanks to a killer crop of restaurants and bars opening along the little lanes off Johnston Road. Joining its sister bar Djiboutii, which is just next door, Deligator has injected a sense of Cuban cool into the neighborhood. It’s casual and colorful inside with naturally crumbling walls, hand-painted murals, and a glass-top bar full of curios from around the world. Open all day, the restaurant and bar serves casual sandwiches like the must-try El Cubano, lobster rolls, and grilled cheese. What the menu lacks in quantity it makes up for in quality—and that goes for the cocktails, too.

Insider Tip: Djiboutii and Deligator are connected by a back alleyway. Start early at Djiboutii for tea-infused cocktails in a stylish setting, then head into Deligator for dinner and a few more drinks.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Barol16 | Dreamstime.com

HOME – Eat to Live

It wasn’t too long ago that Hong Kong felt like a desert for vegans and vegetarians, but now it’s easier than ever to find a delicious plant-based meal. From the same restaurateur behind the city’s belovedMANA! Fast Slow Food comes HOME – Eat to Live, which is passionately devoted to protecting and celebrating the environment. Not only does the restaurant generate zero waste and provide biodegradable packaging, but it also sources ingredients from urban rooftop gardens and organic farms in the New Territories. Head here if you’re looking for gluten-free, raw, vegan, or vegetarian food that’s anything but boring. Even the most dedicated carnivores will appreciate the flavorful vegetarian burgers, toasty flatbreads, earth bowls, and nutritious cocktails.

Insider Tip: Did we say cocktails? Yep, this health-conscious outpost serves nutritious cocktails. Try the Jade—packed full of green pepper, spinach, kale, apple, and a healthy dose of tequila.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

65 Peel

65 Peel

Named after its address, 65 Peel is easy to find but much, much harder to leave. The new concrete-cool bar in Soho is devoted to craft beers, offering tasting flights from the nine local beers on tap, including Moonzen Brewery, Young Master Ales, Black Kite Brewery, Lion Rock Brewery, and more. There’s also a handful of brews to try from Taiwan, New Zealand, and Japan. As for the menu, it’s not your average pub grub—instead, prepare your palate for impressive seafood dishes such as sea urchin tartare and freshly shucked oysters.

Insider Tip: Wondering what the neon sign by the bar says in Chinese? It translates to “western herbal tea,” which clearly means “beer”!

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Maison Eight

Maison Eight

If you’re traveling to Hong Kong, it’s probably safe to assume that harbor views are high on your must-see list. Instead of joining the masses atop The Peak, see and be seen at Maison Eight. The French restaurant sits atop 8 Observatory Road, a skyscraper in Tsim Sha Tsui, and ushers in a well-heeled clientele for champagne, cocktails, and a penthousesuite vibe. It’s all about luxury and exclusivity, which is why Maison Eight boasts four distinct rooms across the huge space, each more fashionable than the next.

Insider Tip: If you’re celebrating something extra special, ask about the private room next to the restaurant’s extensive wine cellar.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

Ken Wu

Bayta

Chef Pauline Steiner’s BAYTA brings Mediterranean cuisine and elegant interiors to Sheung Wan. If you don’t immediately fall in love with the design—picture copper, woody furniture and dramatic teal—then the menu will surely win you over. Choose from a two- or three-course tasting menu that highlights fresh produce, refreshing flavor combinations, and contrasting textures. Dishes like creamy grilled sea bass, asparagus cannelloni, celery couscous with beetroot merguez, and clove-infused chocolate bring an element of surprise to the table. Each course comes with fresh homemade bread that’sinfused with herbs and spices, alongside fruity olive oil. 

Insider Tip: BAYTA is the sister restaurant of popular La Cabane a Vin wine cellar and La Cabane Wine Bistro, both off Hollywood Road. The brand-new address also happens to be one of the few restaurants in Hong Kong where you can find natural wine, which promises to leave you headache-free the next day.

PLAN YOUR TRIP: Visit Fodor’s Hong Kong Guide

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