Sign Up
Newsletter Signup
Free Fodor's Newsletter

Subscribe today for weekly travel inspiration, tips, and special offers.

Passport: Your weekly travel wrap-up
Today's Departure: Your daily dose of travel inspiration

Back To Line

Royal Caribbean International: Oasis of the Seas

Oasis of the Seas Review

Christened in 2009 as the world’s largest cruise ship, Oasis of the Seas set the bar high for Royal Caribbean’s fleet with innovative features and amenities, some of which are making their way to other fleetmates.

The world’s largest cruise ships are so

massive that each is divided into seven neighborhoods—distinguished by purpose (spa and fitness, pool and sports), age (youth zone), design (Central Park and the Boardwalk), or function (entertainment). At the heart of the ships are the indoor Royal Promenade, lined with café-style eateries and lounges. Outdoors, Central Park’s pathways meander through the ships’ “town square,” which evolves from a tranquil and peaceful atmosphere during the day to a gathering space for alfresco dining and entertainment in the evening. Connecting the two is an open-air elevator that doubles as a bar where patrons can order drinks during the ride.

Royal Caribbean hits all the marks with nearly two-dozen bars and lounges and a wide variety of restaurants to choose from. There are many open spaces to play in—including two surfing simulators, two rock-climbing walls, and the first zip line on a cruise ship that stretches across the Boardwalk neighborhood. The Boardwalk itself features a carousel in a setting that evokes the nostalgia of seaside piers of yesteryear. The centerpiece of the AquaTheater is the largest and deepest freshwater pool found on a ship where you can swim by day and watch a water show after the sun goes down.

Big, bigger, biggest! In the early 1990s, Royal Caribbean launched Sovereign-class ships, the first of the modern megacruise liners, which continue to be the all-around favorite of passengers who enjoy traditional cruising ambience with a touch of daring and whimsy. Plunging into the 21st century, each ship in the current fleet carries more passengers than the entire Royal Caribbean fleet of the 1970s, and has amenities—such as new surfing pools—that were unheard of in the past.

All Royal Caribbean ships are topped by the company's signature Viking Crown Lounge, a place to watch the seascape by day and dance at night. Expansive multideck atriums and promenades, as well as the generous use of brass and floor-to-ceiling glass windows, give each vessel a sense of spaciousness and style. The action is nonstop in casinos and dance clubs after dark, while daytime hours are filled with poolside games and traditional cruise activities. Port talks tend to lean heavily on shopping recommendations and the sale of shore excursions.

Read More

What You Should Know

Pros

  • Reservations for specialty dining and most shows can be made prior to sailing
  • The adults-only solarium has cabanas for rent that afford extra privacy
  • To keep in touch with family members, you can rent a "Wow Phone," essentially an iPhone that only works on board

Cons

  • You might want to pack an umbrella—the sprawling Central Park is open to the elements
  • On ships this large, lines are inevitable
  • Hold onto your wallet—there are extra charges at every turn, even for cupcakes
Ship Stats
  • Crew Members 2,394
  • Entered Service 2009
  • Gross Tons 225,282
  • Length 1,187 Feet
  • Number of Cabins 2,706
  • Passenger Capacity 5,400
  • Width 208 feet

Add Your Own Review

When did you go?

Minimum 200 character count

How many stars would you give?

Service

Food

Décor

Value

Cruise Forums

Have a cruising question? Ask our Fodorite community.

Cruise Deals

Find the best deals in cruises from our partners.

Store

Shop our travel guides on European, Caribbean, and Alaskan cruises.

Back To Top