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Trip Report Pilgrimage to Machu Picchu - Travel Report

Finally, I was there! Yay!

Machu Picchu is on my ultimate travel bucket list for so long because of its unique beauty and fascinating history.

Situated at 2,360 meters above sea level, in the Urubamba River Valley, the Machu Picchu Citadel was abandoned by the Incas in the 16th century when plagues afflicting the empire along with Spanish military campaigns waged by conquistadors. The “city in the sky” was then left behind, well protected by nature until it was once again discovered on July 24, 1911, by an American explorer, Hiram Bingham. Today, tourists could visit this one of the world’s greatest ancient wonders by train, or on foot.

*Inca Trail*

Going on a 4-day trek through the historic Inca Trail and reach Machu Picchu is definitely a once-in-a-lifetime experience. I had done so much research about the trek and sadly I couldn’t make it in the end because of the time constraints and tourist limit. I would recommend, though, any of my friends who are contemplating a visit to Peru going for it (or maybe I will go back there someday). The Inca Trail is a historic route used by the Incas in the old times to enter Machu Picchu. The trail goes through ruins of Sacsayhuaman and the picturesque Sacred Valley. To protect the trail from erosion and overuse, the Peruvian government is limiting the number of trekkers to about 200 each day per season; as a result, trekking groups always books out rather quickly, and sometimes books out months in advance.

For more photos, and details, you are welcome to visit my blog: https://knycxjourneying.com/2017/10/01/pilgrimage-to-city-in-the-sky/

Not only the trail has a limit, but also the Machu Picchu Citadel has a limited access to around 2,500 visitors per day. You could imagine that the train and entry tickets could be sold out pretty fast, especially during peak season. Even the train fare may rise tremendously, it doesn’t stop the crowd from their pilgrimage to the 7 wonders of the world. Unless you plan on staying in Cusco for a long time, it’d be better to reserve tickets in advance to avoid disappointment.

My excursion to Machu Picchu kicked off as I was picked up at my hotel in Cusco 6 AM, catching the 8 AM train to Agues Calientes, a small town at the bottom of the valley next to Machu Picchu, at the Poroy train station. Although I was a little tired (thank God, I didn’t suffer much from the high altitude in Cusco - Machu Picchu is lower), I was really excited and couldn’t wait to see the sites with my own eyes. Before I board the train, I was given the roundtrip train and bus tickets and the entry tickets to the Citadel. I enjoyed my morning coffee looking out to the glorious view of the Sacred Valley, as the train started with sunlight beaming through the windows on the roof of the cabin. It was called Sacred Valley, as I was told later by another tour guide because the valley contains some of the most fertile lands in the region, and it was the property of the Inca Emperor himself.

Some visit Machu Picchu on a day trip, but I wouldn’t recommend it. The day trip starts on the same train and tourists reach Agues Calientes by noon, and they had about 2 hours in the Citadel before rushing for the 2 PM train returning to Cusco. I decided to take the overnight trip so that I would fully absorb the beauty of the site. The train doesn’t offer much space for luggage storage. Passengers could only bring a small luggage (or better yet, a backpack) and they have to leave their giant luggage behind at the hotel in Cusco, while the most hotel would be able to provide the storage service. Once I arrived Agues Calientes, the hotel staff were already waiting at the exit to pick up my bags and I could go straight to the Citadel with my small bag. I planned to walk around and stay in the Citadel as much as I could. Before closing, the site was much less crowded and I could enjoy the quietness with the Citadel for a while. I was even greeted by a group of llamas roaming and grazing in the mountainous terrain.

The bus ride uphill takes about 25-minutes and it was a steep and narrow path that put driving skills to the test. During my bus ride, I noticed a beautiful hill and it was Phutuq K’usi, a small hill on the other side of the river, and it could be seen from a lot of spots in the Citadel.

It takes roughly 2 hours to complete the classic visitor’s route of the site, depending on the speed. The route starts and ends at the viewing point and it is the best location to view the entire heritage site. The trip usually continues with the Upper Circuit, passing through the Main Temple, the Three Windows Temples, the Main Square, the Sacred Rock, and ends at the entrance of Huayna Picchu. The Lower Circuit covers the lower parts of the Citadel including the Palace of the Mortars, Condor Temple, Sun Temple Royal Tomb, Royal Palace, to Tower.

*Other things to do in Machu Picchu Citadel*

Huayna Picchu Peak: Huayna Picchu is probably one of the most photographed hills in the world (or at least in Peru).

Again, there’s a limit to go up to the peak of the “Young Peak” and it is a steep climb. It requires about 2- 2.5 hours but hikers could enjoy a unique and spectacular view of the Machu Picchu Citadel.

Machu Picchu Peak: Takes about 1hour to go up to the peak of the “Old Peak” and it would be a great viewpoint of the classic Machu Picchu.

Inti Punku (Sun Gate): It was a less challenging walk to the Sun Gate and the route was actually the final part of the Inca Trail, and Sun Gate is where the trekkers could get the first glimpse of the Citadel.

You are welcome to visit, share and comment @ my blog: https://knycxjourneying.com/2017/10/01/pilgrimage-to-city-in-the-sky/

*What is the best time to visit Machu Picchu? *

Most suggested the best time to visit Machu Picchu is from April to October in the dry season. The blooming season begins in October and continues until March. I visited there in December and luckily I still got to see the entire Huayna Picchu on day 1, and there’s a different kind of beauty seeing the hills embraced by the misty clouds #mistyclouds

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