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Question about the Dutch "IJ"

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Hallo allemaal,

I know that there are a fair number of people who can speak Dutch on Fodor’s, so I thought I would attempt my question here.

When listening to modern Dutch people, newscasts, TV shows and song, I’ve noticedthat most folks seem to pronounce the “ijn” in words like “pijn” and “zijn” in a way that sounds similar to the “ine” of English words like “mine” and “pine”, although with a slightly more pronounce diphthong . However, listening to a singer I just discovered, Boudewijn de Groot, I noticed that he pronounces his “ijn” in words like “pijn” and “zijn” very similar to the “ain” of English words like “pain” and “main”.

My question is this: Is his way of pronouncing the “ij” a regionalism, a standard variation, a poetic way of speech, or an old-fashioned way of pronouncing the letters? My first thought was old-fashioned since I notice he trills his “R” in a way I’m not accustomed to hearing from modern Dutch and that seems to remind me of some older songs and news clips I’ve heard.

I’ve included below the Boudewijn de Groot video (the “ijn” sounds in question are about 1 minute 45 minutes in). By the way, I like what I’ve heard of his music and I do find myself liking the way he pronounces words.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEQ68a1XzRI

Best wishes, Daniel

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