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Trip Report Lincolnshire Churches

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We have spent the last few months visiting some of the lovely churches in Lincolnshire. They are now on the web here:
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/index.html

English churches are a much undervalued part of our countryside. We tend to take them for granted and apart from places like Lincoln Cathedral,
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_two/lincoln_cathedral/index.html
few people visit our churches apart from the occasional christening, wedding or funeral. This is a shame as many of the churches are well worth visiting. There is always a sense of excitement as we push open the door. We are rarely disappointed.

The lovely Minster Church of St Mary at Stow with its Saxon tower and Norman architecture, predates the cathedral and is often referred to as the Mother Church of Lincoln.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_three/stow/index.html

Another church with a saxon tower and baptistry is St Peter’s in Barton upon Humber. The church was the site of a major Saxon cemetery which was the cause of great excitement and interest when it was excavated about 20 years ago. The church is no longer in use and is cared for by English heritage with an exhibition with displays of skeletons and grave goods.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_one/barton_peter/index.html

St Edith’s Church is well off the beaten track with only a farm for company. The church survived damage during the Reformation and still has its Rood Loft with stairs.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_one/coates/index.html

St John the Evangelist in Corby Glen is just a typical English church from the outside, but inside the walls of the nave and side aisles are covered with C14th and C15th wall paintings. Not only are these the best wall paintings to survive in Lincolnshire, they are among the best in the country. If you want to find out what a medieval church may have looked like, then this is the place to visit.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_one/corby_glen/index.html

Very different is the small classical church of St Helen’s in Saxby
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_three/saxby/index.html
and the grander All Saint’s Church in Gainsborough.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_one/gainsborough/index.html

In Medieval times, Lincolnshire was a lot more heavily settled than now. The Black Death and a series of bad harvests led to many villages being deserted. The churches survive but many are no longer in use and are cared for by the Churches Conservation Trust.

The chancel of St Lawrence’s Church, Snarford was enlarged in 1600 to house the grand tombs of the St Paul family. Behind the altar is the massive six poster bed tomb of Sir Paul and his wife Faith. Simon Jenkin’s in England’s Thousand Best Churches says “It deserves to rank with the Great Bed of Ware in the catalogue of English slumber”. It has to be seen.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_three/snarford/index.html

All Saints’ Church in Theddlethorpe has some of the most beautiful carved wood screens in Lincolnshire.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_three/theddlethorpe/index.html

The tiny brick built St george’s Church at Goltho has an unspoilt Georgian interior.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_one/goltho/index.html

St Martin’s Church at Waithe has a stunning tiled chancel built as a mausoleum for the Haigh family of nearby Grainsby.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_three/waithe/index.html

And finally there is the ruined St Botolph’s Church Skidbrooke, reputedly the most haunted site in Lincolnshire....
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/lincolnshire/lincolnshire_three/skidbrooke/index.html

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