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How to travel without a valid passport

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This is meant for fun but no doubt will bend a few people's nose out of joint.

It is entirely possible to travel in Europe and to/from Europe or to other countries without having a valid passport. That is because there are countries where an expired passport is legally considered as valid proof of citizenship.

Two of those for example are the UK and Canada. A UK citizen therefore can fly into the UK on an expired passport and a Canadian citizen can fly into Canada on an expired Canadian passport. I can assure you this is a fact as the last time I personally did it (couple of years ago) was on a passport that was expired by about 12 years and the only comment Immigration made when seeing it was, 'do you know your passport is expired?' To which I answered, 'yes' and that was the end of the conversation.

Now take those same 2 passports and imagine travelling from N. America to Europe using them again and again. Assuming you have both (many people have dual or more nationalities), you could travel indefinitely without ever buying a new passport. Since the advent of the EU, that means you could travel throughout most of Europe as well.

I sometimes feel a tiny bit sorry for those people who only have access to one passport and one from a country that doesn't even accept an expired one as legal proof of citizenship.

This ability to travel on expried passports puts a real kink the airline's habit of trying to insist on return tickets as well. Airlines will tell you that you must have 'proof of onward travel' for those same two countries I have given as examples above. In fact NEITHER of those two countries require proof of onward travel for entry into the country. It is the Airlines who insist on that, pure and simple.

Now imagine the airline saying to a UK citizen buying a one way ticket to the UK and presenting an expired UK passport, 'you can't do that'. Hilarious. Have you ever seen that line on a UK passport that says, "Her Britannic Majesty's Secretary of State Requests and requires in the Name of Her Majesty all those whom it may concern to allow the bearer to pass freely without let or hindrance, and to afford the bearer such assistance and protection as may be necessary."

Refusing to board a UK citizen based on 'incorrect' or 'insufficient' documentation in such a case would in fact amount to an international incident. Can't you just see the headlines now, 'United Airlines refuses boarding to UK citizen. Queen demands that heads roll.'

The South Korean who got upset over how nuts were served, wouldn't hold a candle to the Queen's rage. LOL

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