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England with tweens - British children's literature theme...

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We have a cotswold cottage on provisional rental for 2 weeks in England. Has anyone done a Brit-lit type tour of the area for teen/tweens? (I know we could travel more, but the DH has to Skype for work some from 3 p.m. to dinner, and prefers settling in, given that work pays for the trip....okay with me :)

They are boys, so I might slay them with the theme, but it might be fun. Or at least funny. Kenneth Grahame, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Beatrix Potter (she may be London, and the Lakes, though, I think), Arthur Rackham.

Any other sources, ideas? I am sure this has been done...

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    Depends what you mean by "children's". For most, though, Lewis Carroll is the obvious author to start with: for many, Oxford is little more (from the Liddell & Scott Greek lexicons in Blackwell's, through the Charles Dodgson plaque in Christ Church hall to the actual stuffed dodo in the Museum of Natural History) than a theme park about Alice and her creator.

    True, most self-respecting teenage boys throw up in horror at the thought of the silly girl. But Dodgson was a maths don, floruited while Oxford was riven by the evolution debates and massively influenced John Lennon's poetry: as so often in Britain, it's the connections and influences that matter far more than the subject matter of the books.

    The Cotswolds themselves are relatively marginal to children's literature (though if you extend the concept, John Buchan's splendid tales of derring-do mostly revolve round his house somewhere between the Cotswold Line and Fosse Way). But it's a good opportunity to introduce the boys to the Mitford clan (mostly buried in Swinbrook, a few yards from the house that provoked their earliest writing) and to Laurie Lee.

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