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Trip Report Churches of North Yorkshire

We love visiting old churches. You never know what to expect when you push open the door. We've spent the last year doing some of the churches in North Yorkshire. This is a large county covering the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors. They are now on the web here:

http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/index.html

All of them are open during the day and apart from York Minster,
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_three/york_churches/minster/index.html
are free to enter, although a donation towards church upkeep is always apprecuiated

It includes places like Ripon cathedral with its Saxon crypt, medieval stone pulpitum and glorious quire stalls. One of the misericords is thought to have given Lewis Carroll the inspiration for the white rabbit in Alice In wonderland.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/index.html

Selby Abbey was the first Abbey to be founded after the Norman conquest and survived the Reformation to become what must be one of the grandest parish churches in England. It has an impressive Norman nave and glorious Gothic chancel.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_two/selby/index.html

Many of the churches date from Saxon times and still contain Saxon work.

All Saints’ Church in Appleton-le-Street has what is described as one of the best Saxon tower towers in the north of England.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_one/appleton_le_street/index.html

All Saints’ Church in Hovingham also has a Saxon tower as well as an C8th carved stone reredos and a C10th Viking cross.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_two/hovingham/index.html

There are more Viking crosses in St Andrew’s Church in Middleton.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_two/middleton/index.html

The delightful St Gregory’s Minster tucked away in Kirkdale has an Anglo-Saxon sundial still in its original position above the south door. Inside, a Saxon doorway leads into the tower and there are the remains of Saxon stones in the north aisle.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_two/kirkdale/index.html

St Mary’s Church in Lastingham has a Norman crypt.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_two/lastingham/index.html

The tiny Norman church of St Michael’s in Barton-le-Street was rebuilt in the C19th using much of the original stonework. Any spaces were carefully filled with Victorian copies of the Norman carvings. It has a highly carved doorway and chancel arch.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_one/barton_le_street/index.html

St Nicholas Church in North Grimston has an amazing carved Norman font as well as a Norman doorway and chancel arch.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_two/north_grimston/index.html

St Peter’s Church in Dalby in the depths of the Howardian Hills is most unusual as it has a massive fortified chancel.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_one/barton_le_street/index.html

St Peter and St Paul’s Church in Pickering has some of the best preserved medieval wall paintings in North Yorkshire. The north and south walls are covered with beautifully executed paintings.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_two/pickering/index.html

There are more wall paintings in St Agatha’s Church in Easby where the chancel walls are covered with C13th wall paintings.

The young son of Richard III is buried in St Helen and the Holy Cross in Sherriff Hutton.
http://wasleys.org.uk/eleanor/churches/england/yorkshire/north_yorkshire/north_yorkshire_three/sherriff_hutton/index.html

Perhaps one of the most unexpected churches is the C19th Christ Church in Appleton-le-Moors built in the French Gothic revival style. The inside is almost mind blowing with its rich carving and pink and white decoration on the walls, reredos and pulpit . Even though I had seen pictures on google, nothing prepares you for the impact of the first sight of the church interior. This is a much loved and cared for Parish church with help yourself refreshments, including home made biscuits, on a table at the back of the church.

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