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British English

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Hi, British Fodorites.

I was hoping for confirmation on British English.

"She then read English at Wadham College, Oxford, graduating with a 2:1."

In the sentence above, 'read' means 'studied, as in to earn a degree in English,' right? Would it be common/correct to use 'read' with any area of study (law, medicine, engineering)? Would it then be correct for one to say, "she is reading English at... ," or "she plans to read English at... ,"?

And I googled '2:1' which showed this means 'second class honors, upper division.' Does that mean, she was the second best student among those pursuing a degree in English (in her graduating year)? What would upper division mean, then, at a university level?

And I had another question: I understand a baby's 'cot' is the common term in England (for a baby's bed), but is 'crib' used, also?

Thanks for your thoughts on the above!

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