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Book recommendation

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Hi, everyone. I just finished reading a book about Paris that I thought was amazing, and I'd like to let people here know about it. It's David McCullough's latest, "The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris." It's a history of well-known Americans who moved to Paris to pursue their passion for art: Americans like Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Mary Cassatt, John Singer Sargent, George Healy, and many many more. There was also a significant group of medical students who moved to Paris in the 1830s because at that time Paris was on the cutting edge of medical education, research, and technology. And the experience and knowledge those medical students (like Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., for one) brought home actually played a significant role in making the United States a top center for medical schools and medical training that it became later in the 19th century. I never knew that before I read this book.

The book is written in an extremely engaging, narrative style that gives it almost the feel of a compelling novel at times. It's really, really wonderful, and I recommend it for anyone who loves Paris and everything Paris has meant and still means for so many people.

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