Europe Forums

Post New Topic

Recent Activity

  • Announcement:
  • Recent Spam Attacks
    by mkataoka Fodor's Editor | Posted on Nov 28, 16 at 01:31 PM
View all Europe activity »
  1. 1 Which airport for Bellagio?
  2. 2 Paris and London Christmas / NY EVE
  3. 3 Trip Report Trip Report Part 2 - Paris, France May 2016
  4. 4 Urgent- Pleaseee HELP - Spain, Italy or France for Xmass and New years
  5. 5 great hotel and food in Lyon
  6. 6 Spain in July
  7. 7 Island Hopping in the Cyclades
  8. 8 Van Gogh Museum advice
  9. 9 Ireland in April-Day trips from Galway base
  10. 10 Help!! 2 week Europe trip with 6 year old daughter in December!!
  11. 11 Full day in Sintra..what to focus on
  12. 12 Overnight trip from Barcelona
  13. 13 5 Days in Switzerland
  14. 14 Bernese Oberland + Luzern 4 days
  15. 15 Where to weekend away from Frankfurt
  16. 16 Northern Italy with 2 kids itinerary help
  17. 17 International Flight Question
  18. 18 Honeymoon on a Budget
  19. 19 I need help deciding ASAP!
  20. 20 Dresden: How Many Nights?
  21. 21 Trip Report We're here!
  22. 22 Choosing a hotel - Campo de' Fiori or Piazza Venezia?
  23. 23 Swiss Trip Itineraryand Charges
  24. 24 New Law Regarding Vacation Rentals in Paris
  25. 25 4+ days in Lisbon over NYE, should we visit Sintra?
View next 25 » Back to the top

Book recommendation

Jump to last reply

Hi, everyone. I just finished reading a book about Paris that I thought was amazing, and I'd like to let people here know about it. It's David McCullough's latest, "The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris." It's a history of well-known Americans who moved to Paris to pursue their passion for art: Americans like Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Mary Cassatt, John Singer Sargent, George Healy, and many many more. There was also a significant group of medical students who moved to Paris in the 1830s because at that time Paris was on the cutting edge of medical education, research, and technology. And the experience and knowledge those medical students (like Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., for one) brought home actually played a significant role in making the United States a top center for medical schools and medical training that it became later in the 19th century. I never knew that before I read this book.

The book is written in an extremely engaging, narrative style that gives it almost the feel of a compelling novel at times. It's really, really wonderful, and I recommend it for anyone who loves Paris and everything Paris has meant and still means for so many people.

6 Replies |Back to top

Sign in to comment.

Advertisement