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Montreal Québécoise restaurant recommendation from foodies for foodies

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May I ask you to please recommend a traditional homerun restaurant serving Québécoise cuisine, preferably within walking distance of the Old Montreal/Old Port area? We are looking for a real tried and true standout. Thank you very much for your suggestions.

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    In multicultural Canada, the only family-run restaurants you are likely to find serve the food of other countries, or just breakfast/lunch.
    The original Quebecois “cuisine” was rural and poor, struggling to survive the long winters. The growth of cities, and incomes, supported better restaurants closely focused on the French table. In the last decade, along with multicultural fusion, eager young chefs have turned their backs on fussiness to use old ingredients in new combinations amid surroundings that are more fun than fancy. Anthony Bourdain has visited some of these places, pigged out, and approved. Think poutine, a greasy-spoon concoction enjoying a fad, added to foie gras or lobster.
    Old Montreal has some “traditional” restos, attracting tourists. Les filles de Roy has lasted nearly half a century, in a stone building reeking of atmosphere. It's been 40 years since I dined there and I've learned a lot since then, but such survival is an endorsement. https://www.hotel-pierreducalvet.com/en/restaurant-les-filles-du-roy/ Ask the staff about the historical significance of the name, complete with pun.
    That area, running west to what is becoming known as Little Burgundy, also shelters some of the new gang. They are celebrities, they like loud music, and writing cookbooks is part of the brand.
    The brashest, or certainly most tattooed, is Iron Chef winner Chuck Hughes, who now oversees two places, Garde Manger and Le Bremner http://www.chuckhughes.ca/
    The Joe Beef chain has two restos and a wine bar http://joebeef.ca/ I cannot personally endorse any of these five spots since I've always acted too late to get a reservation.
    Leader of this motley pack is possibly Martin Picard at Au pied de cochon, up the hill in the lower Plateau area, where I had a good time. Despite acclaim and notoriety, he has stuck to the one narrow, cheerfully noisy open kitchen, piling on the seafood and all of the pig with historical knowledge and the determination of a hunter. http://www.aupieddecochon.ca/?lang=en
    Reservations are practically mandatory at these places. Most of them offer on-line booking, but a telephone call may be more secure and effective.
    Montreal is serious about dining out and has several websites to search for restaurants. I use http://www.restomontreal.ca/?lang=en to find bistrots, usually small, which allow you to bring your own wine, often with no corkage fee (in French, AVV, for apporter votre vin.)

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