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French Polynesia and...a toddler?

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I'm trying to plan a relaxing vacation for my husband and I (30's) and our 1.5 year old son. I know absolutely nothing about Tahiti and French Polynesia, but I noticed it's a direct 8 hour flight from LA (where we live) and they have Hiltons and Marriots (we have points to redeem). Would we be crazy to take a toddler to Tahiti? We're not divers or sailers, but we love nature and beautiful scenery, good food, and friendly people and learning about new cultures. We just want to relax together as a family. We're experienced travelers, just no experience in the South Pacific :). Thank you!!

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    First, many young families do go to FP. We have taken a 5 yr old.

    Whether it is crazy or not depends on what you want to do there. The scenery is water and the mountains/atolls. Some sailing in the lagoon, skippered by someone else, is quite enjoyable.

    Look at different islands in FP. Tahiti is the biggest and that is where the international flights land. However, it does not have that turquoise lagoon look you see in pictures offered by other smaller islands. Because FP is heavily promoted to international visitors as a honeymoon destination, what you might need to do is to sort out which islands you might feel comfortable. I have been to Bora Bora three times and over the years, it has changed from a laid back island to a busy cruise port heavily visited by honeymooners. The last time, we felt out of place in Bora Bora not being young honeymooners. However, it is without doubt has the prettiest combination of lagoon, atoll, and that high mountain.

    Moorea is an easy plane/boat ride from Tahiti. While it is a well visited island, it offers more that island look you are looking for. I saw more families type visiting here.

    I have not been to Huahine or Tahaa.

    I liked Rangiroa in the Tuamotu Archipelago (not Society Island chain part of FP where most visitors go.) It has that isolated island feel with the biggest flat salt water I have ever seen. There were many families at Kia Ora resort, and of course the honeymooners. For non divers, the activities are just relaxing at beach or pool or taking a whole day cruise across the lagoon to an atoll.

    Food is good throughout FP. I hope you like fish. You already know the prices in FP. Research the prices, allocate sufficient fund, so that you won't get sticker shocks.

    I don't know when you are heading there, but if you can sync with Heiva festival in July, you get to see cultural exhibits mostly geared towards locals but also to visitors. Out side this and weekly Polynesian dance shows, most people tourists deal with are in the tourist industries and the relationship is on a business basis. Speaking French or Tahitian would help you in this regard.

    One place you will come close to the locals outside the tourist industry is when you ride "le truck" bus service. The driver and the money takers are often husband and wife team and they speak hardly any English. But they are very helpful in getting you to where you want to go and help you make sure you get off at the right place and direct you which direction to walk. Because you sit with other passengers, often families traveling together, I had some small talks with those who did not mind talking to tourists rather than watching the same familiar scenery go by.

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