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A sociological question: Are the people of Vietnam unhappy?

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I ask this because I have been going through a great many photographs I took while traveling in Southeast Asia during September and October, and I've started to notice that the only country with very few smiling people is Vietnam. More specifically Northern Vietnam, as we didn't get to the south this trip.

I'm struck by how many Vietnamese people in my photographs look glum or are scowling.

In contrast, the people of Bali and Laos look joyful. They often have big smiles, or are laughing.

Now you might reasonably ask if the reason for the lack of smiling was because they had just met me. If that were the case, who could blame them?

But most of the photographs were candid, the subjects never knew they were being photographed.

Now smiling isn't proof of happiness, nor is frowning a sure sign of unhappiness. But from my memory, many people in Vietnam seemed more stressed and less warm and happy than those in other nearby countries.

Could it be change due to increasing industrialization?
Or greater emphasis on materialism and the pressure to make money? (We noticed more people in Vietnam trying to get as much money as possible from us than in other countries during this trip.)
A colder climate?
Or is it cultural?

Or were your experiences just plain different than mine?

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