Africa & the Middle East Forums

Post New Topic

Recent Activity

View all Africa & the Middle East activity »
  1. 1 Buy real /fake American passport
  2. 2 Best books to read before Morocco visit? (not guide books)
  3. 3 5 Interesting Nigerian Marriage Traditions
  4. 4 4 Nigerian Foods with Foreign Origins
  5. 5 refers to the problem of connecting
  6. 6 Southern Africa or Tanzania/Kenya for August 2018 Family Trip
  7. 7 Cerebral X:-Elevated concentration
  8. 8 Trip Report 4th Safari with Warrior Trails in 2016
  9. 9 Shimba Hills Mombasa Kenya Would This Works As A Day Trip From A Cruise?
  10. 10 Lady Liuwa no more !!
  11. 11 4 Interesting African Traditional Wedding Customs
  12. 12 Gamewatchers are great for helping plan
  13. 13 Trip Report Family4Travels to Israel & Petra -matzos, mezze and Menachem!!
  14. 14 Women's wear for Dubai?
  15. 15 Dubai Guide
  16. 16 Solo/female/40's US traveler req tour operator recommendations
  17. 17 Trip Report Trip Report: Madagascar and Rwanda
  18. 18 Cape Town/ Wineland Tour
  19. 19 Bush plane luggage (again)
  20. 20 Loldia House Kenya
  21. 21 rekero and encounter mara vehicles
  22. 22 Alexandria
  23. 23 kicheche compared to porini
  24. 24 best bag to get for fly in safari in kenya
  25. 25 Planning Tanzania trip-how many months?
View next 25 » Back to the top

Mango Elephants In The Sun

Jump to last reply

by Susana Herrera

I bought this book for �1.99 from a cheapy cheapy remainder book shop on Charing Cross Road yesterday as I walked up from Leicester Sq area to Tottenham Court Road after a long lunch with a new internet friend (after having filled her head with dreams of Africa and then, the pleasures of browsing Stanford's Africa section).

Mango Elephants In The Sun is the tale of a 23 year old American woman who travels to Cameroon with the Peace Corps (92-94) and takes a position as a teacher for 2 years in a small village there. She gets paid only enough to buy groceries (though evidently enough to splurge on food/ bus/ taxi every now and then). The story takes us through her struggle against the belief that every white person, especially from America, is rich, her difficulty in finding her own methods for gaining the respect of her students and her slow but sure establishment of strong friendships in her African community. When she arrives in Africa she is emtionally wounded from her life to date and seeking some kind of answer to it all.

The start is a little too schmaltzy/ spiritual but it very quickly improves - I can't believe how involved I became in her story after a few chapters.

As I came to the end of it I found myself weeping so much I could hardly read and sitting in an absolutely freezing cold bathtub.

Anyway, although the poetic nature of her writing is occasionally a little too contrived, mostly it is genuine and exciting and emotionally charged.

I really enjoyed it. Don't know if anyone else will but...

I thought I'd share.

1 Reply |Back to top

Sign in to comment.

Advertisement