Africa & the Middle East Forums

Post New Topic

Recent Activity

View all Africa & the Middle East activity »
  1. 1 MTV Video Music Awards 2016 Live Stream
  2. 2 Fly or Train from CMN to Fes/Marrakesh
  3. 3 First Safari trip-on the right track?
  4. 4 best bag to get for fly in safari in kenya
  5. 5 First time safari advice and awkward question
  6. 6 Souvenirs from South Africa
  7. 7 Viator tour company
  8. 8 tours in Johannesburg
  9. 9 Planning my last day in Morocco
  10. 10 Trip Report Egypt Quickie Trip
  11. 11 South African Cities
  12. 12 First Time Safari Help...Use a tour or not?
  13. 13 Luggage protection for Joburg?
  14. 14 Travelling during Purim or not?
  15. 15 East African Visa Beware!!!
  16. 16 Stanleys Camp Luggage
  17. 17 where to go in africa
  18. 18 Help with Flight Option: CMN or RAK
  19. 19 Trip Report Ethiopian Holidays You Should Not Miss
  20. 20 Best Wineries - 2-3 days in Franschhoek and Stellenbosch
  21. 21 Tentative Itinerary - what do you think?
  22. 22 Help with bags
  23. 23 Royal Air Maroc Dreamliner JFK-CMN and maybe connect to RAK
  24. 24 4 DAYS IN MOROCCO- AGADIR OR ESSAOUIRA??
  25. 25 MOROCCO FOR 10 DAYS
View next 25 » Back to the top

Lamu and Malindi travel report

Jump to last reply

I recently flew to Nairobi in order to visit some of the coastal communities of Kenya, specifically Lamu and Malindi. This is a brief trip report.
Lamu
Lamu is an island among several islands on the north coast of Kenya. Its population, 26000 in the main center of Lamu Town, is predominantly Muslim. Much of the male population goes to pray in the mosques on Fridays (also wear white gowns and head caps) and many of the women dress in black and cover their faces. The influences of Arabian traders can be seen in the architecture of a Swahili culture.
The main trades are tourism and fishing. Transport is mainly by donkey carts. I saw a few bicycles and two wheelbarrows. Otherwise, people walked to and from the shops and waterfront. Our visit in May coincided with the tourism low season, when rains fall in a daily deluge. We lucked out and had no rains and few tourists. We stayed at the Lamu Palace, conveniently located a few blocks from the center of town and right on the waterfront. From the front veranda, we watched local fishermen unload baskets of fish from their boats, women in black wading out into the water to catch the local dhou to home, and boys sailing their handmade boats in the murky waters. Donkeys wandered the streets in the same laidback style that men sat on mosque steps. I felt entirely safe as I wandered through the narrow alleys and visited the daily market with my companions. Early evenings were the best times to be out and about because the humidity during the day was oppressive.
For snorkelers, I can recommend the coral grows on the far side of Manda Island. The dhou ride takes about 90 minutes and you can be dropped in right over the edge of the reef. There was much coral growth, although there seemed to be a growing cover of algae. Water clarity was not great but the water was calm.
Malindi
Malindi is a 30 minute flight from Lamu. It also has the Swahili cultural influence although we did not experience it. Instead, we stayed out of town at the Coral Key Beach Resort http://www.coralkeymalindi.com/ which had its own sand beach and calm waters great for an easy snorkel. There we found crabs, a conch and several fish species among the grass beds. We also took a trip out to the marine park, which has been in existence since Kenya’s independence in 1963. We saw cowries, corals, a vast variety of reef fish and even an octopus.
The walk into town was about 2 miles, so we took a 3 wheeled taxi tour of downtown. It’s a much larger place than Lamu with many shops and stores. On our final day in Malindi, the rains came in torrents and we were glad to be returning to Nairobi.

7 Replies |Back to top

Sign in to comment.

Advertisement