Africa & the Middle East Forums

Post New Topic

Recent Activity

  • Announcements:
  • Forums Style Refresh
    by Emily_D Fodor's Editor | Posted on Apr 27, 15 at 11:33 AM
  • Introducing MeganM
    by Emily_D Fodor's Editor | Posted on Apr 24, 15 at 03:23 PM
View all Africa & the Middle East activity »
  1. 1 www.spamstuff.cc >> Sell all spam stuff, sell email pass, scampage
  2. 2 Staying overnight at Nairobi Airport as solo female traveler?
  3. 3 Morocco--advice on itinerary needed!
  4. 4 Suggestions for a group tour
  5. 5 5 nights in Cape Town - 5 restaurants
  6. 6 Cape Town Itinerary
  7. 7 Custom Morocco guide recommendations requested
  8. 8 Tanzania and Kenya tour company?
  9. 9 Trip Report South Africa self drive, March 2015
  10. 10 Best African safari destination – in addition to Masai Mara Conservancy?
  11. 11 Car Rentals in Israel
  12. 12 Dubai hotels
  13. 13 FRS Ferry between Tarifa and Tangier
  14. 14 Pulse Africa???
  15. 15 Kruger
  16. 16 Morocco to Tel Aviv --flights
  17. 17 Trip Report Uganda Trip Report
  18. 18 Eastern Cape Safari?
  19. 19 itinerary any ideas?
  20. 20 Winelands, South Africa - Need a Plan
  21. 21 Namibia.It has suddenly dawned on me.
  22. 22 Two Weeks in Capetown, want to add a safari
  23. 23 Anybody used Classic Africa to plan a safari?
  24. 24 Trip Report Five Thousand Years in 19 days - Pyramids, Tombs, Camels and a River
  25. 25 ISRAEL on SATURDAY - Transport
View next 25 » Back to the top

Erg Chigaga (also called Chegaga)

This is an area of sand dunes located on the western border of the Souss-Massa-Draa area of Morocco between the towns of M’Hamid el Ghizlane and Foum Zguid, southwest of the larger town of Zagora. There are numerous desert camps located on the northeast edge of the dune area that offer overnight accommodations for tourists through tour companies located in the aforementioned towns. The dune area can only be accessed via 4X4 (or a long camel trek) since the closest paved roads end at M’Hamid in the east (a 2 hour drive) or Foum Zguid in the west (3 hours by vehicle). The track from M’Hamid or from Foum Zguid traverses mixed desert terrain of sand, mud flats and stony desert (hamada) traveling between two distant mountain ranges to the north and south following the wide ancient path of the Draa River in its southern reaches. Beyond the southern mountain range lies the closed border of Algeria, approximately 25-30 km south of M’Hamid. The dry bed of Lake Iriki lies west of Chigaga. It was once part of the route of the storied Paris-Dakar rally and it is easy to attain speeds of 80 km/hr on this flat cracked-mud surface. The stony hamada is particularly evident on the last arduous hour of the approach to Foum Zguid but for rock hounds there are parts that are very fossil-rich. Other lesser dune areas visible on the trek to Chigaga from M’Hamid include Erg Mezouaria and Erg Ezzahar (or Zehhar) although it is hard for the casual tourist to distinguish one from another.

The actual greater Erg Chigaga dune area is about 30-40 km long and 10-15 km wide with low dunes interspersed with small flat pan areas. The tallest dune is called Lhabidia or La Grande Dune (29°50'31.78"N, 6°12'35.76"W) and it is approximately 120m high. The desert camps are typically within sight of this dune. Camps offer accommodations in tents or semi-permanent mud-walled cabins. There is no electricity (except with noisy generators), and no cell phone service although one of the camp operators reputedly has a satellite phone for medical emergencies. The only permanent modern structure is an unused school north of the dunes. A typical camp stay involves a late day arrival with dinner and entertainment supplied by the camp staff around a communal fire with an early morning departure after a modest breakfast. Some camps offer wine for purchase.

Chigaga is part of an arid area that is technically part of the North Saharan steppe and woodlands ecoregion. Certainly not barren, acacia trees and numerous flowers and desert plants (berberis in particular) are visible as well as nomad livestock – camels, sheep, goats, donkeys – which can often be seen grazing in the greener areas or clustered around remote waterholes depending upon the year’s rainfall and the time of year.

It is a fascinating area with a stunning arid landscape and well worth the effort to visit.

(I wrote this for another purpose but I thought it might be of use here).

No Replies |Back to top

Sign in to comment.

Advertisement